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Global Digital & Innovation Director

Max Askwith

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Homes for Good

Homes for Good

We also see increasing initiatives around how communal spaces are managed in high density residential areas, starting with making the most of existing infrastructure. In Paris, 95% of the venues selected for use during the 2024 Summer Games already exist or will be temporary. Paris is also actively repurposing its available underground space and rooftops into urban farms offering Parisians fresh produce with a low carbon footprint. Other initiatives centre around how we share inside spaces in tightly packed residential areas to nurture relationships. In Chengdu, China, the architects of the Youkong Living Room have reimagined shared spaces in buildings as buffer zones between urban spaces and homes, where residents can form a sense of community through social activities they wouldn’t be able to enjoy in their smaller apartment units. As one of the consequences of global lockdown has been greater social isolation for certain groups, we believe similar initiatives will be replicated in many cities on the long term. Narrowing our focus to individual homes, we see consumers paying special attention to brands and products that improve physical and mental wellness inside their household. While this behaviour is not new, we expect it to accelerate as a consequence of the pandemic, with people being more aware of sanitation guidelines, and more attentive to the direct relationship between their environment and their health. GUNRID - The air cleaning curtain from IKEA Today on Vimeo. Yet, this increased scrutiny of products doesn’t stop at health considerations; it extends to entire product lifecycles. For many consumers, wellness is not complete without knowing that their consumption is not damaging the environment. Upcycling by design - the act of turning waste or abandoned products into new products of environmental value - is rapidly gaining traction. And for many people, a singular focus on sustainability is no longer enough to tackle climate change. They want to fill their homes with products that do not have a burdensome effect on the planet or the surrounding community and they expect brands to be climate positive by offsetting the emissions they create. As consumers become increasingly conscious of how the products they bring into their homes are produced, transported, packaged and recycled, we expect they will choose brands and products that do good by design. To stay relevant on the long term, brands will have to earn their places in our eco-conscious spaces by demonstrating their values alongside their value. This article is excerpted from the new Vizeum report Future of Home. Download it now for key insights on the trends shaping the home revolution. div.iframe{ text-align: center; } 1199 The Homes for Good revolution is afoot. Homes for Good means looking beyond the utility and monetary value of the goods we purchase to also consider the cumulative impact of our consumption decisions on our communities, our personal health, our wellbeing, and our environment. This broader examination of lifestyles extends from the cities in which we reside to how our homes function, to the means by which products are delivered to us. It breaks with the view that negative externalities such as pollution are unavoidable evils of prosperity, and explores ways to embed goodness by design in our daily lives while supporting economic growth. For instance, in 2019 the New Zealand government introduced its first wellbeing budget which recognises that the success of the nation cannot be solely captured by short-term GDP variation, and needs to include the long-term impact of social and environmental policies as well. When thinking of Homes for Good, the obvious first aspect to consider is the way our homes are built. According to the International Energy Agency, the residential sector accounts for 20% of final energy consumption. Cement production alone reportedly accounts for eight percent of global CO2 emissions each year. With growing urbanisation forecast over the next decade, city officials and architects are under pressure to make biodiversity a central supporting element for the wellbeing of city dwellers.

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Home as a place for new connections

Home as a place for new connections

With further connections playing out in homes, our digital socialising will be as diverse as we are: fun, precious, vulnerable, or exciting. For brands to be accepted and thrive, they need to understand groups’ dynamics, local communities’ specific contexts, and individuals’ emotional state so they can adopt the right tone and add value to the conversations. This article is excerpted from the new Vizeum report Future of Home. Download it now  for key insights on the trends shaping the home revolution. 200 While technology enables us to chat with people on the other side of the world, immediate proximity remains essential. With the ongoing pandemic, people have looked increasingly to their local communities and neighbourhoods to stay informed and give a helping hand. Much of this has been driven by technology, with the formation of tribes on messaging platforms or the use of social networks with a local focus. For instance, Nextdoor is a private social network for which users cannot sign up without a code sent to their home address or a cell phone using the same billing address as the one used to register. The process guarantees that members are real residents of neighbourhoods, making the groups more private and useful. We predict hyperlocal behaviour will stick post-pandemic, especially as people grow increasingly concerned about the carbon footprint of their daily activities. It will be down to brands and tech platforms to capitalise on engaging people at a hyperlocal level. 100 @burberry Ready for the #TBChallenge? Master the Thomas Burberry Monogram now ♬ Some Velvet Morning (feat. Kate Moss) - Primal Scream Click here to see the video 450 Social media is still the reigning champion of social interactions online. In 2013, the Harlem Shake took the world by storm, followed shortly by the Ice Bucket Challenge in 2014. Since then, fun and quirky challenges have seen massive uptake with the rise of platforms such as TikTok, and are now the new favourite pastime of the next generation. Brands and public bodies need to keep an eye on these ephemeral challenges - often popping up out of nowhere and being replaced as quickly as they appear - to make the most of these viral opportunities at the relevant time. For example, Vietnam's National Institute of Occupational and Environmental Health recently collaborated with a local artist to adapt the lyrics of a local pop hit so that it would encourage young audiences to wash their hands during the pandemic. The institute then asked another artist to choreograph a viral dance, which immediately took off and started the global #GhenCoVyChallenge. 700 As new technology enters the home and makes interactions more lively, an increasing number of our day-to-day activities at home are becoming socialised. There has been a boom in home video communication devices designed to make it easier for people to connect with their friends and families. For instance, devices like Facebook Portal enable people to enjoy hands-free communications while they are going about their daily routines, without losing visual contact. Although technology is progressively turning all of us into streamers, albeit to audiences of one or a few, connections at home are go beyond one-on-one socialising. Gaming, in particular, presents people an opportunity to connect with ever growing communities where livestreaming platforms enable players to watch others play and meet like-minded individuals. In April 2020, almost 1.5 billion hours were spent watching gaming content on Amazon Twitch, the industry leader, representing a 98% growth year-over-year. Interestingly, as these platforms become more popular, they open up to new content. The number of hours watched on Twitch’s Just Chatting channel - which is not dedicated to gaming discussions - grew by 138% in the same period. As livestreaming audiences grow and diversify, opportunities for brands to reach them develop, either through content or advertising. 0

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Life as a subscription

Life as a subscription

As technology creates more opportunities to buy from home, retail spaces need to reinvent themselves to focus on experiences and to shift their focus from single purchases to longer term subscriptions. Brands invested in brick & mortar spaces have a unique opportunity to reallocate their square footage and move from purely logistics considerations, such as storing stock, to new approaches to entice customers, such as real-world product tests, specific classes for advanced users, community events or art installations. Economics, technology and climate change are reshaping peoples’ expectations about ownership. Consumers want affordable products and services, personalised to them, minimising waste, improving over the course of the product lifetime, and easily accessible at their doorsteps. When they venture outside their homes, consumers expect retail spaces to offer more than what they could order online in their living rooms. In order to future-proof their businesses, brands need to rethink and adapt their offerings to address this changing nature of ownership.   This article is excerpted from the new Vizeum report Future of Home. Download it now for key insights on the trends shaping the home revolution. 200 NU SCHOOL | for anyone just joining us, a quick how-to about how it all works #ChangeYourClothes See how it works: https://t.co/9zit4O2goi pic.twitter.com/FxkLQFnhVH — nuuly (@shopnuuly) September 11, 2019 Watch the video here 150 Subscription as a Service is progressively becoming a new norm. Subscription-based models and on-demand renting solutions now encompass a wide range of product categories. Luxury is no exception. Platforms such as Front Row enable customers to rent pieces designed by the most prestigious fashion houses for a few days. As a result, consumers can change their clothing more frequently without paying the full purchase price, and brands can reach new audiences of potential buyers once familiarised with the products. Additionally, as almost eight out of ten Gen Z and Millennials now declare they have purchased or want to purchase pre-owned, repaired, or renewed products, more retailers are exploring new forms of ownership that encourage refurbishment and recycling. For example, in line with its circular economy ambition, IKEA aims to develop subscription-based leasing offers for furniture, through which customers may lease a piece of furniture for a while and then upgrade, with the old piece being refurbished for other users. We also see how data sophistication is leading to innovation in the subscription model. For instance, some fashion enterprises remove the stress of the in-store fitting experience by letting customers receive a variety of products and choose which bits they like before sending back everything else. Through algorithmic curation, data from past product interactions can be used to refine the products featured in the next shipment. This increased personalisation improves the relevance of the selection, reducing waste and countering the anxiety that can result from too many options. In the backend, brands are learning to adapt their supply chains to cater to this new way of processing shipments and returns, and adopt the right commercial terms to be regularly featured in the recommendations of such services. 100 Socioeconomic and environmental macro trends are driving change in the nature of ownership. From the disparity between rising house prices and stagnant wages to the environmental impact of their consumption, the so-called Generation Rent is growing more conscious about how their choices Influence every aspect of Iife. According to research by IBM, nearly six in ten consumers are willing to change their shopping habits to reduce environmental impact, and about seven out of ten Gen Z and Millennials declare they have rented or want to rent products instead of purchasing. For a long time, only wine and spirits makers could credibly claim that the older their products get, the better they become. However, the emergence of technology and software updates has created a new model: the perpetual product upgrade. Today, Apple WWDC and Google I/O annual conferences resonate far beyond their original audience of developers and have turned into true cultural tentpoles. As firmware evolve, connected devices can and are increasingly expected to improve over the course of their lifecycles. Updates present multiple benefits for users. They provide new features and enhanced security without requiring a new device. They also increase the perceived value of products that consumers have already purchased; rather than depreciating, devices actually get better over time. Yet, this approach has limits when brands stop supporting older models, and it can even drive consumer backlash, for instance, when brands brick devices through updates (i.e., making them unusable). 0

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