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Home as a Playground

Home as a Playground

Consumers’ in-home access to experiences has increased exponentially over the last years. While media is the heart of these new immersive moments, advertising sits at the fringes. Many of the ecosystems supporting these experiences were not originally designed to embed advertising, and their business models (e.g., subscriptions, micro transactions, games sales) do not rely on advertising to thrive. This creates a dual challenge for brands. First, to find their place in these environments, they need to develop innovative content-led integrations that add value to platforms without alienating users. Second, as these experiences do not exist in a vacuum, consumers’ expectations do not disappear once they sign out. This increases pressures on brands to elevate their overall marketing effort through a renewed focus on interactivity and experience if they are to build lasting connections. This article is excerpted from the new Vizeum report Future of Home. Download it now for key insights on the trends shaping the home revolution. Content 3 1399 Yet, the real revolution is happening on the software side, deeply transforming the way we consume culture. The nearly unlimited access to content offered by video streaming platforms has created new on-demand cultural moments, as illustrated by Netflix’s already iconic Tiger King series. While the recent lockdown seems to have cemented video streaming as a turning point in media consumption, things get even more interesting as streaming's rise in power collides with another steadily growing trend, gaming. The $159 billion a year industry is now looking into cloud computing to fuel its growth, with Google betting big on its Stadia platform. The gaming sector also keeps reimagining how people can make the most of its virtual worlds. For instance, Fortnite's popular Battle Royale game is now hosting live concerts of artists such as Marshmello and Travis Scott. By venturing beyond its original genre, Fortnite has attracted millions of participants looking for new kinds of shared cultural moments. Beyond playing, we also observe that consumer curiosity for personal development in the home environment has become an enduring trend, with professional training available on demand.  Content 2 1199 As a result of the social distancing measures made necessary by the COVID-19 pandemic, most of the outside entertainment opportunities we were used to, such as cinemas, concerts and sports games, have been cancelled. Consequently, people are looking for entertainment options inside their homes. Fortunately, the new home playground powered by hardware and software has not relegated us to downgraded experiences – quite the opposite. Hardware has traditionally been at the heart of the home experience. Over the last few years, home devices took a giant leap in terms of sophistication (new soundbars like Sonos’ Arc are dynamically tuned to the unique acoustics of rooms) and democratisation (more than 100 million 4K TVs are estimated to have been sold in 2019). But today, technology can do much more than recreating the cinema at home, with the most immersive experiences now starting in the living room. Both Sony's and Microsoft’s next generation consoles, equipped with enhanced specs to render increasingly photorealistic and richer worlds, are expected for the 2020 holiday season. Virtual reality (VR) headset shipments are set to more than quintuple in the next four years, and the technology is gaining traction well beyond its roots in gaming. For instance, in 2019, rugby fans could already enjoy spectacular 360-degree video highlights of the World Cup games. Content

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Home as a Polymorph

Home as a Polymorph

In other cases, we also see that home is a place to educate, nurture and grow as home schooling and online classes take on new significance in our daily lives during lockdown. Physical health is the most oft-quoted driver of people’s sense of health and wellbeing, and the home is increasingly turning into a place to exercise and heal. Peloton, the fitness company offering gym hardware and online workout classes, more than tripled its number of subscribers over the last two years. The integration of live streaming and social elements has led to rapid developments in replicating the gym experience in the home, from yoga instructors moving their classes online to Joe Wicks, a YouTube fitness instructor dubbed UK’s Physical Education Teacher for leading daily classes for kids to stay in shape at home.     We anticipate technology will play an increasingly important role in supporting healthcare systems. For instance, medical teleconsultations could help populations with limited mobility such as senior citizens or populations that live in medical deserts to talk more regularly with healthcare professionals from the comfort of their homes. People are also keen to have proper dining experiences at home. The worldwide popularity of food delivery services is skyrocketing as illustrated by the market capitalisation of the leader in this space, China’s Meituan Dianping, recently passing the $100B milestone. In a slightly dystopian way, consumers can now get home delivered meals from restaurants where they will never be able to dine in person (a.k.a. ghost kitchens) or from menus they will never find in actual restaurants (a.k.a. virtual brands). Additionally, with the growing interest in cooking, platforms such as Gousto use artificial intelligence to propose bespoke recipe recommendations for which users can order only the necessary ingredients. The role of home is expanding as we bring in more activities. The objects and services brands will offer will need to deliver agility, multi-functionality and personalisation to provide lasting value. Brands that recognise this polymorphic nature of homes and design smart solutions to make the most of indoor spaces are likely to perform better in the years to come. This article is excerpted from the new Vizeum report Future of Home. Download it now for key insights on the trends shaping the home revolution. Content 3 1399 Home is much more than an entertainment hub. It has become a polymorphic space where we work, dine, play, get healthy and replicate outside world experiences. Pandemic confinement accelerated this pre-existing trend, and the home is now under pressure to become the primary – and for many, the only – venue for life’s various activities: work, learning, downtime, shopping, fitness, dining, rest, childcare, socialising, creativity, romance, and cultural nourishment. With the constant need for economical accommodation, particularly in cities, the home has to multitask and be more efficient with space than ever before. Working from home is not a new phenomenon. In 2019, about 27 million Americans[i] and 13 million Europeans[ii] were already working remotely. However, the mass work-from-home experiment due to stay-at-home orders is making it a reality for millions more for the first time, and many companies have been forced to adapt to agile working almost overnight. What does this mean for the future of work? As cloud computing and collaboration tools such as Microsoft Teams have enabled many of us to work from home fairly seamlessly, the needs to occupy large costly office space in city centres and business travel are likely to come under scrutiny. After working from home for months, employees will expect flexible working arrangements with the option to work from home and minimise commuting. Home is also a place to pamper, and we expect beauty and care services performed at home to become a fast-growing category. With the rise of platform-based services such as blow LTD and Urban, there is no need to leave home for a haircut, a massage or a manicure. Beauty specialists will come directly to you. While such companies have not reached mass market levels yet, their platform models enable them to better understand their clients' individual wellness needs over time. Consequently, they will probably gain a competitive edge over independent or single-service salons to provide personalised beauty services to consumers. Content

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VIZEUM LAUNCHES SPARK

VIZEUM LAUNCHES SPARK

In Cannes last year: Vizeum hosted their very own Dentsu Aegis Dragons' Den style event showcasing our new Spark start-up engagement programme. 3 start-ups were invited to step into our start-up den to win over our dragons with their best ideas on how digital can empower society. The event - hosted by BBC worldwide reporter Lucy Hockings – featured our very own Dentsu Aegis Dragons headed up by David 'Shingy' Shing, AOL's (self proclaimed) Digital Prophet with Vizeum's Global President Thomas Le Thierry, Gabrielle McGee of the Tory Burch Foundation and our client Maggie Dehler from Fox completing the jury. Our start-up line up included; Cluep, SUPA A.I and Smartzer who all had a mere 5 minutes to win over our jury. A brave challenge to take on! Cluep pitched their text analysis and image recognition engine as a solution to higher levels of civic engagement. By targeting people based on what they're sharing and feeling it could enable governments to better connect with people empathetically and emotionally. Smartzer pitched their clickable, shoppable and interactive videos as a digital solution to enabling clickable donations for charitable fundraising via video content. While SUPA A.I pitched how their apparel digital sensor could facilitate the largest vault of digital health data for GenZ, in turn empowering scientists to find solutions for major health issues. SUPA A.I was crowned the winner with their potential to positively impact future health outcomes. Check their products out here if you're interested in being SUPA'd! You can view the full event video here on the DAN Facebook page.

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Norwegian Seafood Council Appoint Vizeum As Their Global Media Agency

Norwegian Seafood Council Appoint Vizeum As Their Global Media Agency

The NSC works together with the Norwegian fisheries and aquaculture industry to develop markets for Norwegian seafood. The NSC joins an already existing group of clients who have consolidated their global business into Vizeum with their global HQs based out of Norway. The account covers the following markets Brazil, Portugal, Norway, Sweden, UK, Spain, Italy, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Japan and Singapore and is estimated to be worth $5m globally. Kristin Pettersen, Director of marketing for Norwegian Seafood Council, said of their decision to appoint Vizeum: “Vizeum showed a level of competence that outdid their competitors. They have solid experience of leading both global and Norwegian client relationships and we shared a similar vision throughout the process. In addition, Vizeum are digital pioneers, and we want to learn from the best” Vizeum Norway have been smashing new business this year, building on a roster of large Norwegian global actors that Vizeum currently works with, such as Norwegian and Hurtigruten. Thomas Barrie, Director of Strategy at Vizeum Norway said of this key win: “We enjoy being able to excel in the competition of winning large global clients. The Norwegian Seafood Council reported back that their choice was based on the combination of our experience, our exceptional employees, our strong network, and a concept that has already proven successful.” For further information on this exciting new account won by Vizeum please contact Michael Nederlof on Michael.nederlorf@vizeum.com

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